Past Events

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Topological Origin of Equatorial Waves"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Brad Marston, Brown University

    Topology sheds new light on the emergence of unidirectional edge waves in a variety of physical systems, from condensed matter to artificial lattices. Waves observed in geophysical flows are also robust to perturbations, which suggests a role for topology. We show a topological origin for two celebrated equatorially trapped waves known as Kelvin and Yanai modes, due to the Earth’s rotation that breaks time-reversal symmetry. The non-trivial structure of the bulk Poincare ́ wave modes encoded through the first Chern number of value 2 guarantees existence for these waves.

  • Experimental Particle Physics Seminar: "Solar neutrino sensitivity of DUNE"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2C2

    Shirley Li, SLAC

  • Astronomy seminar: "Reverse Engineering the local Universe"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory

    Edoardo Carlesi, IAP Potsdam

    Constrained simulations (CS) provide a powerful alternative approach to the random-phase Initial Conditions (ICs) cosmological simulations. In this method, galaxy peculiar velocity measurements are used to reconstruct the matter density field and generate a set of ICs whose final outcome closely matches the observed Universe. Hence, while the results obtained with the standard techniques can be compared to the data in a statistical sense only, in a CS we can exploit the constraining potential of the high-precision near-field observations by means of a direct comparison. 

  • Special Soft Matter Seminar: "Physical interactions reduce the power of natural selection in growing yeast colonies"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3C2

    Andrea Giometto, Harvard University

    Microbial populations often assemble in dense populations in which proliferating individuals exert mechanical forces on the nearby cells.

  • Department Colloquium

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Speakers: Robyn Sanderson, Liang Wu, Bo Zhen, University of Pennsylvania

    Robyn Sanderson: "What can a billion Milky Way stars tell us about dark matter?"

    Liang Wu: "Therahertz studies on symmetry and topology in quantum materials"

    Bo Zhen: "Topological photonics on the nano scale"

    Host: Joe Kroll

  • TODAY'S SEMINAR IS CANCELED Condensed Matter Seminar: "Let it rip: In vivo biomechanics studies of Hydra regeneration from tissue spheres"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Eva-Marie Shoetz Collins, Swarthmore College

    TODAY'S SEMINAR IS CANCELED

  • Astronomy seminar: "Stellar Forensics with the Most Powerful Explosions in the Universe"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Maryam Modjaz, New York University

    Supernovae (SNe) and Long-duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are exploding stars and constitute the most powerful explosions in the universe. Since they are visible over large cosmological distances, release elements heavier than Helium, and leave behind extreme remnants such as black holes, they are fascinating objects, as well as crucial tools for many areas of astrophysics, including cosmology.

  • Dissertation Defense: "Testing New Weak Lensing Measurement Techniques with the Dark Energy Survey"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N9

    Christina Krawiec

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: "Pulling the Holographic Boundary into the Bulk"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Yasunori Nomura, University of California Berkeley

  • Special High Energy Theory Seminar: "Primordial black holes as dark matter"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N12

    Alex Kusenko, UCLA

    I will discuss new and rather generic scenarios for production of black holes in the early universe.  In some mass range, such black holes can account for all dark matter.  Primordial black holes can also contribute to synthesis of heavy elements by disrupting neutron stars.