Past Events

  • Astro Seminar: "Understanding large-scale structure from the CMB"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Emmanuel Schaan (Princeton)

    In this seminar, I will present two ways in which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sheds light on critical uncertain physics and systematics of the large-scale structure.

    Shear calibration with CMB lensing (arXiv:1607.01761):

  • Math-Bio seminar: "TBA"

    Carolyn Lynch Laboratory, 318

    Erol Akcay, University of Pennsylvania

  • Primakoff Lecture: From (Astro)particle Physics to Applications: The Role of Scientific Institutes for the Development of Society

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Rolf Heuer (CERN) Hosted by Joe Kroll

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, particle physics entered a new era. The LHC project will provide a deeper understanding of the universe and the insights gained could change our view of the world.

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Quantum control and quantum error correction with superconducting circuits"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2E17 (Faculty Lounge---Note location change)

    Mazyar Mirrahimi, INRIA (French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation)

    The development of quantum Josephson circuits has created a strong expectation for reliable processing of quantum information. Active quantum error correction (QEC) is regarded as the next major step towards building a many-qubit (quantum bit) quantum processor, which is robust against dissipation/decoherence. To implement QEC, the quantum information is redundantly encoded in a high-dimensional Hilbert space of a quantum system.

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Dimensionality reduction in the analysis of human genetics data"

    Carolyn Lynch Laboratory, 318

    Petros Drineas, Purdue University

    Dimensionality reduction algorithms have been widely used for data analysis in numerous application domains including the study of human genetics. For instance, linear dimensionality reduction techniques (such as Principal Components Analysis) have been extensively applied in population genetics. In this talk we will discuss such applications and their implications for human genetics.

  • High Energy Seminar: "New Forms of Quantum Entanglement in Discretely Gauged Theories"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Vijay Balasubramanian (UPenn)

  • High Energy Seminar: "New Forms of Quantum Entanglement in Discretely Gauged Theories"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Vijay Balasubramanian (UPenn)

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Engineering new materials from old materials"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Cory Dean, Columbia University

    Graphene is probably the best known "exfoliatable" material, in which a  two-dimensional sheet of carbons atoms, just one atom thick, can be peeled from a bulk piece of graphite.  However this represents just one of a larger class of van der Waals materials, in which atomic monolayers can be mechanically isolated from the bulk.  The capability to integrate these materials with one another provides an exciting  opportunity  in which we can "mix and match" the constituent material properties, by fabrication of multi-layered heterostructures.  In this talk

  • Astro Seminar: "Weak Lensing in the Nonlinear Regime"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Jia Liu (Princeton)

    Within the next decade, galaxy and CMB lensing datasets of unprecedented precision will come online from large surveys (DES, HSC, LSST, Euclid, WFIRST, AdvACT, SPT-3G, CMB-S4, etc.).

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Grand challenges in phylogenomics"

    Carolyn Lynch Laboratory, 318

    Tandy Warnow, University of Illinois

    Estimating the Tree of Life will likely involve a two-step procedure, where in the first step trees are estimated on many genes, and then the gene trees are combined into a tree on all the taxa. However, the true gene trees may not agree with with the species tree due to biological processes such as deep coalescence, gene duplication and loss, and horizontal gene transfer.