Events

  • Condensed Matter seminar: “The Berry curvature of metals and the crossover from composite fermions to exciton superfluid”

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Inti Sodemann-Villadiego, Max Planck Institute, Dresden

    The first part of this talk will summarise our progress in non-linear transport of metals. I will describe a non-linear Hall effect that is allowed by time reversal symmetry and is controlled by the "Berry curvature dipole” (the average of the Berry curvature gradient in momentum space). I will argue that such Berry curvature dipole offers a solution to the old problem of defining an “order parameter” for broken inversion symmetry in metals, by playing the role of a non-linear version of the Drude weight.

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Tensor Gauge Theories of Fractons"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Michael Pretko, University of Colorado

    A fracton is an unusual new type of emergent quasiparticle, first proposed in the context of quantum spin liquids, which does not have the ability to move by itself.  Rather, fractons can only move by forming certain bound states.  In this talk, I will show that symmetric tensor gauge theories provide a natural theoretical framework for fractons, with the unusual mobility restrictions encoded in a set of higher moment charge conservation laws, such as conservation of dipole moment.  I will then show how the tensor gauge theory formalism identifies the conventional ela

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Sagar Vijay, Harvard University

  • Condensed Matter seminar

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Debanjan Chowdhury, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Excitons in Flatland: Exploring and Manipulating Many-body Effects on the Optical Excitations in Quasi-2D Materials"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Diana Qiu, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Since the isolation of graphene in 2004, atomically-thin quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) materials have proven to be an exciting platform for both applications in novel devices and exploring fundamental phenomena arising in low dimensions. This interesting low-dimensional behavior is a consequence of the combined effects of quantum confinement and stronger electron-electron correlations due to reduced screening.

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Quantum Many-Body Physics Beyond Ground States"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Thomas Iadecola, University of Maryland

    Recently a set of traditional assumptions in quantum condensed matter theory has been upended by the realization that many-body systems can host stable quantum phenomena at infinite temperature.  I will discuss recent work suggesting that there is a much richer landscape of such phenomena than has so far been appreciated.  First, I will show how strongly disordered quantum many-body systems can spontaneously segregate into delocalized and localized degrees of freedom, leading to a so-called "mobility emulsion." Second, I will discuss how symmetries in otherwise generic sys

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Fracton phase of matter: Lattice models, gauge theories and realizations"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Yizhi You, Princeton University

    Fracton phase of matter shares many features of topological order, including long-range entangled ground states and non-trivial braiding statistics. At the same time, fracton phase contains subextensive ground-state degeneracy and the restricted mobility of quasiparticle which exclude itself from the TQFT paradigm. In this talk, I start from several solvable lattice models as candidates for Fracton order. Further, I will present a theoretical framework on higher rank Chern-Simons theory in 3D as the low energy effective theory for Fracton phase.

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Delving Into the Nanoscale World With Thin-Film Nanofluidic Devices"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Jason R. Dwyer, University of Rhode Island

    Thin film nanofluidic devices offer a diverse range of platform architectures and capabilities for nanoscale sample characterization and single-molecule sensing.

    view more..

  • Condensed Matter seminar

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Nina Marković, Goucher College

  • Condensed Matter seminar

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Eva-Maria Collins, Swathmore College