Past Events

  • Experimental Particle Physics Seminar: "Solar neutrino sensitivity of DUNE"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2C2

    Shirley Li, SLAC

  • Astronomy seminar: "Reverse Engineering the local Universe"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory

    Edoardo Carlesi, IAP Potsdam

    Constrained simulations (CS) provide a powerful alternative approach to the random-phase Initial Conditions (ICs) cosmological simulations. In this method, galaxy peculiar velocity measurements are used to reconstruct the matter density field and generate a set of ICs whose final outcome closely matches the observed Universe. Hence, while the results obtained with the standard techniques can be compared to the data in a statistical sense only, in a CS we can exploit the constraining potential of the high-precision near-field observations by means of a direct comparison. 

  • Special Soft Matter Seminar: "Physical interactions reduce the power of natural selection in growing yeast colonies"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3C2

    Andrea Giometto, Harvard University

    Microbial populations often assemble in dense populations in which proliferating individuals exert mechanical forces on the nearby cells.

  • TODAY'S SEMINAR IS CANCELED Condensed Matter Seminar: "Let it rip: In vivo biomechanics studies of Hydra regeneration from tissue spheres"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Eva-Marie Shoetz Collins, Swarthmore College

    TODAY'S SEMINAR IS CANCELED

  • Astronomy seminar: "Stellar Forensics with the Most Powerful Explosions in the Universe"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Maryam Modjaz, New York University

    Supernovae (SNe) and Long-duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are exploding stars and constitute the most powerful explosions in the universe. Since they are visible over large cosmological distances, release elements heavier than Helium, and leave behind extreme remnants such as black holes, they are fascinating objects, as well as crucial tools for many areas of astrophysics, including cosmology.

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: "Pulling the Holographic Boundary into the Bulk"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Yasunori Nomura, University of California Berkeley

  • Special High Energy Theory Seminar: "Primordial black holes as dark matter"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N12

    Alex Kusenko, UCLA

    I will discuss new and rather generic scenarios for production of black holes in the early universe.  In some mass range, such black holes can account for all dark matter.  Primordial black holes can also contribute to synthesis of heavy elements by disrupting neutron stars. 

     

  • Experimental Particle Physics Seminar: "Anomaly of Dancing Reactor Antineutrinos"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3C8

    Soo-Bong Kim, Seoul National University

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation(RENO) started data-taking from August, 2011 and has observed the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle theta13. The experiment has analyzed roughly 2200 days of data to make an accurate measurement of the oscillation amplitude and frequency based on energy and baseline dependent disappearance of reactor antineutrinos.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Learning force fields from stochastic trajectories"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Pierre Ronceray, Princeton University

    From nanometer-scale proteins to micron-scale colloidal particles, particles in biological and soft matter systems undergo Brownian dynamics: their deterministic motion due to the forces competes with the random diffusion due to thermal noise. In the absence of forces, all trajectories look alike: the key information characterizing the system's dynamics thus lies in its force field. However, reconstructing the force field by inspecting microscopy observations of the system's trajectory is a hard problem, for two reasons.

  • Astronomy seminar: "Two instruments to start the new decade: HERA for 21cm cosmology and SPARCS to Monitor M-Dwarf flares affecting exoplanets"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Daniel Jacobs, Arizona State University

    Two new kinds of instruments are coming of age at the end of this decade: low frequency radio telescopes and cubesats, both being used to probe questions of our cosmic origin and the nature of exoplanets. The redshifted 21 cm hydrogen line is a unique probe of the early universe. A recent putative detection by EDGES, of a larger than expected signal, raises more questions. The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is designed to answer these questions by providing high significance detection of fluctuations in the redshift range 6 to 20.