Past Events

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "The memory of sand"

    Room A4, DRL

    Matthieu Wyart, New York University

    Complex systems are characterized by an abundance of meta-stable states. To describe such systems statistically, one must understand how states are sampled, a difficult task in general when thermal equilibrium does not apply. This problem arises in various fields of science, and here I will focus on a simple example, sand. Sand can flow until one jammed configuration (among the exponentially many possible ones) is reached.
  • Astrophysics and Cosmology Seminar

    DRL A6

    Samaya Nissanke (Caltech)

  • High Energy Theory Seminar

    DRL 2N36

    Alejandro Satz

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "The Criticality Hypothesis: How cortical networks might optimize information processing"

    Room A4, DRL

    John Beggs , Indiana University

    To function optimally, living neuronal networks have been hypothesized to operate near a critical point, poised between a phase where activity is damped and a phase where activity is amplified. However, previous experimental evidence for critical dynamics has been controversial. Here we present new results to demonstrate that networks containing hundreds of cortical neurons are indeed operating near a critical point. This finding allows tools from statistical physics to be applied to the brain, and may point the way to a new description of healthy and diseased information processing.
  • Astrophysics and Cosmology Seminar

    DRL A4

    Lucianne Walkowicz (Princeton)

  • High Energy Theory Seminar

    Matteo Fasiello

  • High Energy Theory Seminar

    DRL 2N36

    Jim Halverson (KITP)

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Elucidating principles of biological signal processing using microfluidic and optogenetic tools"

    Room A4, DRL

    Megan McClean, Princeton University

    Biological networks, like electrical circuits, take specific inputs (nutrient availability, stress, hormones) and convert them into appropriate outputs (transcriptional responses, metabolic remodeling).  Electrical engineers uncover the inner workings of such circuits by measuring the transfer function between input voltage and output voltage.  However, unlike electrical engineers, biologists are more limited in the input signals they can generate to interrogate such networks.  We are developing microfluidic and optogenetic tools to generate dynamic inputs to interrog

  • Astrophysics and Cosmology Seminar

    DRL A6

    Renee Hlozek (Princeton)

  • High Energy Theory Semianr

    DRL 2N36

    Scott Watson (Syracuse University