Past Events

  • PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY CAREER SEMINAR: 10 Essential Steps to Successful Job Hunting for Physics PhD Students

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3W2

    Dr. Joseph Barber, Senior Associate Director (Penn Career Services)

    Whether you are applying for faculty positions or for jobs in the broad range of other industries/fields that value a STEM PhD, there is plenty you can and should be doing throughout your PhD to position yourself for success. Attend this session to get advice about what to do in your limited professional and career development time to understand yourself and your career goals, explore your career options, and to develop an effective job searching strategy.  

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "The Case for an Exciton Metal in Bilayer Graphene"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Michael Zaletel (Princeton University)

    Graphene based heterostructures have emerged as a pristine platform for exploring the interplay of symmetry, topology and non-Abelian excitations in the quantum Hall regime. I will begin with a theoretical review of the quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene before discussing results in collaboration with the Young Lab at UCSB. Using in-situ control of the density and electro-magnetic fields, they find a rich phase diagram which features a plateau at half-filling of a Landau level with a gap several times larger than previously observed.

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: (TBA)

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Mukund Rangamani (UC Davis)

  • Joint Mathematics & Physics Seminar: 6D SCFTs and Group Theory

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4C2

    Tom Rudelius (IAS)

    Certain classes of superconformal field theories in six dimensions (6D SCFTs) are in one-to-one correspondence with certain classes of group homomorphisms.  In this talk, we will see that this correspondence allows us to classify homomorphisms that were previously unknown in the mathematics literature and understand aspects of 6D SCFTs that were previously unknown in the physics literature.  We speculate on the implications for the future study of 6D SCFTs and these group homomorphisms.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Jamming of non-circular and deformable particles"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Mark Shattuck (City University of New York)

    We study mechanically stable packings of deformable and rigid 2D circulo-polygons using computer simulations. A 2D circulo-polygon is a particle shape formed by the collection of all points equidistant from the edge of a polygon. It is a generalization of the 2D circulo-cylinder and a circle, which are the collections of all points equidistance from a line and a point, respectively. In our model, the circulo-polygon can be deformable, where the only constraint on the particle is that shape factor, the ratio of the area of the polygon to the square of the perimeter, is fixed.

  • Astro Seminar: "Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters: from Weighing the Giants to LSST"

    Anja von der Linden (Stony Brook)

    Surveys of galaxy clusters provide a sensitive probe of cosmology by measuring the evolution of the halo mass function. However, already current cluster surveys are systematically limited by uncertainties in the relation between cluster mass and observables (e.g. X-ray luminosity, cluster richness, SZ decrement). Cluster weak lensing is the most promising observational method to calibrate the mass scaling to the needed precision but requires the control of systematic errors to a few percent each.

  • HET & HEE Joint Seminar: "Applications of the Average Null Energy Condition"

    Center for Particle Cosmology

    Clay Cordova, (IAS Princeton)

    Local energy conditions are the key hypothesis in many classical results in general relativity.  In quantum theory, these local energy conditions are invalidated due to quantum fluctuations.  Nevertheless a weaker condition, the so-called average null energy condition still holds in quantum field theory. I will explain how this condition constrains the data of conformal field theories such as operator product coefficients and scaling dimensions.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Advanced Electron Microscopy Approaches for Condensed Matter Research"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Eric Stach (University of Pennsylvania)

    In the next year, the Singh Nanotechnology Center will install two new scanning transmission electron microscopes that will bring Penn’s capabilities in atomic scale materials characterization to a world leading level.  In this seminar, I will describe these capabilities using examples from my own research, from the literature and I will include the latest available results from the instrument manufacturers.  This seminar will be deliberately forward looking and is intended to inform the Penn Condensed Matter community of the full scope of capabilities so that they may pla

  • Advances in Biomedical Optics Seminar: "ROS Explicit Dosimetry for Photodynamic Therapy"

    CMROI Conference Room, B1 Stellar Chance Laboratories, 440 Curie Blvd

    Timothy Zhu (HUP)

    (Pizza will be served at 11:45 am)

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Decoding of pairwise coalescent times and detection of recent adaptation in biobank-scale SNP array data sets"

    318 Carolyn Lynch Laboratory

    Pier Francesco Palamara (Harvard School of Public Health)

    Coalescent hidden Markov models (HMM) such as the pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent (PSMC, Li and Durbin, 2010) enable estimating the locus-specific posterior distribution of the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of a pair of haploid chromosomes when high-coverage sequencing data is available. I will present the “ascertained sequentially Markovian coalescent” (ASMC), a coalescent HMM that can be used to accurately estimate locus-specific TMRCA probabilities in widely available SNP array data.