Past Events

  • Special Condensed Matter Seminar: "Shining light on topological insulators and Weyl semimetals"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Liang Wu, University of California, Berkeley

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion of research investigating the role of topology in band-structure, as exemplified by the wealth of recent works on topological insulators (TIs) and Weyl semimetals (WSMs). In this talk I hope to convince you that optical probes of solids give unique insight into these topological states of matter.

  • Astro Seminar: "Quenching and Bulge Growth Over Cosmic Time in Massive Galaxies"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Marc Huertas-Company (Paris Observatory)

    The life of a galaxy is a balance between processes that trigger star formation by accelerating gas cooling and others which tend to prevent stars to form by expelling or heating gas.  Over the past years, the picture is emerging that, during most of its life, a galaxy seems to live a rather quiet life, gradually growing in stellar mass through the formation of new stars which are formed at a rate remarkably proportional to its stellar mass, This is interpreted as an indirect evidence that fuel in the form of cold gas is somehow continuously being fed into the galaxies to susta

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Fast, scalable prediction of deleterious noncoding variants from genomic data"

    318 Carolyn Lynch Laboratory

    Adam Siepel, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Across many species, a large fraction of genetic variants that influence phenotypes of interest is located outside of protein-coding genes, yet existing methods for identifying such variants have poor predictive power. Here, we introduce a new computational method, called LINSIGHT, that substantially improves the prediction of noncoding nucleotide sites at which mutations are likely to have deleterious fitness consequences, and which therefore are likely to be phenotypically important.

  • Special Condensed Matter Seminar: "Non-equilibrium dynamics of a frustrated Mott insulator"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Zhanybek Alpichshev, M.I.T.

    What happens to electrons when both the spin orbit coupling and inter-particle Coulomb repulsion are very strong? While SOC alone can change the topology of the single particle insulating state, even short range on-site repulsion by itself can give rise to a Mott insulator - one of the most mysterious and thought provoking phases in solid state physics. In this seminar I will talk about the behaviour of quasiparticles in a frustrated Mott insulator in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • ADVANCES IN BIOMEDICAL OPTICS: Exploring Brain Interactions with Diffuse Optics

    B1 Stellar Chance Laboratories, 440 Curie Blvd

    Rickson Mesquita (University of Campinas)

    The human brain can be seen as a complex system due to its functional capabilities and structural organization. Indeed, previous works employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) have shown several complex features of the brain.  In this talk I will approach how one can employ diffuse optics to reveal the brain's complex features during the resting state. In particular, I will discuss our recent results on the use of graph theory to characterize the spatial interactions of the healthy and the diseased brain. Last, I will explore potential clinical applications of our methodology, mostly on brain development and rehabilitation

    (Pizza will be served at 11:45 am)

  • Astro Seminar: "Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4C8

    Zhilei Xu (Johns Hopkins University)

    Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of telescopes to observe Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in Chile. CLASS will make large angular scale CMB polarization measurements in frequency bands at 40 GHz, 90 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The five-year CLASS survey will constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the 0.01 level, and also provide more information on reionization, the sum of neutrino mass and the Galactic interstellar medium. In my talk, I will introduce the science and design of CLASS experiment.

  • Special Condensed Matter Seminar: "Real-space imaging of a nematic quantum liquid"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Ben Feldman, Princeton University

    Electronic phases in condensed matter systems generally respect the symmetries of their solid state host. However, interactions among electrons can give rise to a variety of exotic correlated states characterized by broken symmetry. An intriguing example is the formation of electron fluids with wave functions that spontaneously break the symmetry of the underlying lattice. These phases are quantum analogues of classical liquid crystals and have recently attracted interest across disparate platforms ranging from high-temperature superconductors to two-dimensional electron systems.

  • Astro Seminar: "Measuring the Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background with POLARBEAR and the Simons Array"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Frederick Matsuda (University of California) hosted by Mark Devlin

    POLARBEAR is a high resolution polarization sensitive instrument in Chile currently observing the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal in order to probe the physics of the early universe and inflation. POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array are next generation installments currently in development with vastly increased sensitivities that will achieve unprecedented constraints on cosmological parameters such as the tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of the neutrino masses.

  • Experimental Particle Physics: "TBA"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4C8

    Alessandro Tricoli (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • High Energy Seminar: "Entanglement, Gravity, and Quantum Error Correction"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Xi Dong (IAS)

    Over the last few years it has become increasingly clear that there is a deep connection between quantum gravity and quantum information. The connection goes back to the discovery that black hole entropy is given by the horizon area. I will present evidence that this is only the tip of the iceberg, and prove that a similar area law applies to more general Renyi entanglement entropies.