Past Events

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Linear payoff relationships in repeated games"

    Carolyn Lynch Laboratory, 318

    Alex McAvoy, Harvard University

    In 2012, the study of the repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma was revitalized by the discovery of a new class of strategies known as “zero-determinant” (ZD) strategies. Through coercion, for example, ZD strategies allow a player to extort the opponent and obtain an unfair share of the payoffs. More generally, a player can use ZD strategies to unilaterally enforce linear relationships on expected payoffs, capturing classical fair strategies like tit-for-tat as well as extortionate and generous counterparts.

  • High Energy Seminar: "TBA"

    TBA

    Ruth Gregory (Durham University)

  • Math-Bio seminar: "Does antibiotic resistance evolve in hospitals?"

    318 Carolyn Lynch Laboratory

    Bernd Sturmfels, University of California, Berkeley

    We present a joint paper with Anna Seigal, Portia Mira and Miriam Barlow, aimed at addressing the question in the title. Nosocomial outbreaks of bacteria and the heavy usage of antibiotics suggest that resistance evolves in hospital environments. To test this assumption, we studied resistance phenotypes of bacteria collected from patient isolates at a community hospital. A graphical model analysis shows no association between resistance and patient information other than time of arrival. This allows us to focus on time course data.

  • Advances in Biomedical Optics: "Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Clinical and Biologic Insights"

    Donner Auditorium, Basement, Donner Building, 3400 Spruce St.

    David Mankoff, Prof. of Radiology (UPenn)

    *These seminars are supported by the Biomedical Imaging and Spectroscopy Laboratory, the Center for Magnetic Resonance and Optical  Imaging, the Department of Radiology and the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Organizers: Wesley Baker, Jeff Cochran, Bryan Chong, Tiffany Ko, and Arjun Yodh,

    Contact: Wesley Baker

    wbaker@sas.upenn.edu

     

    (Pizza will be served at 11:45 am)

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Physics of the Peacock’s Dance"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Suzanne Amador Kane, Haverford College

    Peacocks are the textbook example of an elaborate mating display--and hence of sexual selection in evolution.  To seduce females, male peafowl perform a complicated dance in which they tilt, pivot and shake their elaborate, iridescent train feathers to present a dazzling visual display accompanied by mechanical sounds.  The eye-like ocelli that decorate these feathers are structurally-colored:  their vivid hues change with viewing angle because they arise from interference of light with photonic crystals of melanin nanorods.  Furthermore, like many birds, peacocks

  • Astro Seminar: "SciServer - A Collaborative Research Environment for Large-scale Data-driven Science"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Gerard Lemson (Johns Hopkins)

    SciServer is a Big Data infrastructure project developed at Johns Hopkins University that provides a common environment for sharable, computationally-intensive research.

  • Experimental Particle Physics Seminar: "Search for right-handed W and heavy neutrinos in the 2l+2j final state at CMS"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4C8

    Jorge Chaves, Cornell University

    Despite the discovery of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson, there are still unanswered questions that are not explained by the SM, such as the nature of the chiral structure of weak interactions. During Run-1 at the LHC, no clear signs for physics beyond the SM were seen, but there were a few hints of possible new physics. One particular hint was a 2.8\sigma excess seen at the CMS experiment in the search for a heavy right-handed W and heavy neutrino. These particles arise when a left-right symmetry is added to the electroweak sector.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Formation of a hexagonal limit-periodic structure"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Josh Socolar, Duke University

    A limit-periodic structure consists of a union of periodic patterns with no largest lattice constant.  The discovery of an aperiodic monotile -- a single tile that forces hexagonal limit-periodic pattern in the same way that the two Penrose tiles force a quasicrystalline pattern -- has opened a new path to the theory of formation of a limit-periodic phase and to its possible physical realization.  A renormalization analysis shows that the limit-periodic ground state can be reached in a slow quench through an infinite sequence of phase transitions, and numerical studies indi

  • Astro Seminar: "The Relationship Between Quasar Activity and Diffuse Cool Halo Gas -- Feeding or Feedback?"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Sean Johnson (Princeton/Carnegie)

    The growth and evolution of galaxies is fueled by gas accretion from circum-/intergalactic gas reservoirs. In turn, gas accretion and cooling is regulated by outflows and heating from supernovae and active galactic nuclei. These outflows enrich the intergalactic medium with heavy elements and produce massive baryon reservoirs in the form of diffuse halo gas. Consequently, the diffuse gas of the inter- and circum-galactic medium (IGM/CGM) represent a sensitive laboratory for studying the accretion and feedback processes that regulate galaxy evolution.

  • Eli Burstein Lecture: "Confinement & Tunneling, Pillars of Nanoscience"

    Glandt Forum (3rd Floor), Singh Center for Nanotechnology, 3205 Walnut Street

    Emilio Mendez: Director of Energy Science and Technology, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Professor of Physics, Stony Brook University

    The properties of materials are in general determined by chemical composition and structure, but at the nanoscale they depend on size as well. As one or more dimensions of a material become increasingly smaller, not only can it inhabit ever smaller spaces; also its surface to volume ratio increases, and at a small enough size (typically well below 100 nm) a number of the material’s properties become governed by quantum mechanics.