Past Events

  • Special Condensed Matter Seminar: "Non-equilibrium dynamics of a frustrated Mott insulator"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Zhanybek Alpichshev, M.I.T.

    What happens to electrons when both the spin orbit coupling and inter-particle Coulomb repulsion are very strong? While SOC alone can change the topology of the single particle insulating state, even short range on-site repulsion by itself can give rise to a Mott insulator - one of the most mysterious and thought provoking phases in solid state physics. In this seminar I will talk about the behaviour of quasiparticles in a frustrated Mott insulator in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • ADVANCES IN BIOMEDICAL OPTICS: Exploring Brain Interactions with Diffuse Optics

    B1 Stellar Chance Laboratories, 440 Curie Blvd

    Rickson Mesquita (University of Campinas)

    The human brain can be seen as a complex system due to its functional capabilities and structural organization. Indeed, previous works employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) have shown several complex features of the brain.  In this talk I will approach how one can employ diffuse optics to reveal the brain's complex features during the resting state. In particular, I will discuss our recent results on the use of graph theory to characterize the spatial interactions of the healthy and the diseased brain. Last, I will explore potential clinical applications of our methodology, mostly on brain development and rehabilitation

    (Pizza will be served at 11:45 am)

  • Department Colloquium: "The Pope of Physics: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Gino Segre (University of Pennsylvania) and Bettina Hoerlin

    Enrico Fermi was unique in a number of ways, including the staggering breadth of his research, from relativity theory and magnetohydrodynamics to instrument development. He was the only 20th century physicist to have attained the very heights of the profession as a theorist and experimentalist as well as the only one to be essentially self-taught. His 1938 Nobel Prize was picked up en route in his flight from fascist Italy with his Jewish wife and children to find a new life in America.

  • Department of Physics and Astronomy: Postponed Exams

    DRL, A1

    Fall 2016 Postponed Exam

    ALL EXAMS ARE FROM 6:00 PM TO 8:00 PM UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE.

  • Astro Seminar: "Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4C8

    Zhilei Xu (Johns Hopkins University)

    Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of telescopes to observe Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in Chile. CLASS will make large angular scale CMB polarization measurements in frequency bands at 40 GHz, 90 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The five-year CLASS survey will constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the 0.01 level, and also provide more information on reionization, the sum of neutrino mass and the Galactic interstellar medium. In my talk, I will introduce the science and design of CLASS experiment.

  • Special Condensed Matter Seminar: "Real-space imaging of a nematic quantum liquid"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Ben Feldman, Princeton University

    Electronic phases in condensed matter systems generally respect the symmetries of their solid state host. However, interactions among electrons can give rise to a variety of exotic correlated states characterized by broken symmetry. An intriguing example is the formation of electron fluids with wave functions that spontaneously break the symmetry of the underlying lattice. These phases are quantum analogues of classical liquid crystals and have recently attracted interest across disparate platforms ranging from high-temperature superconductors to two-dimensional electron systems.

  • Astro Seminar: "Measuring the Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background with POLARBEAR and the Simons Array"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Frederick Matsuda (University of California) hosted by Mark Devlin

    POLARBEAR is a high resolution polarization sensitive instrument in Chile currently observing the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal in order to probe the physics of the early universe and inflation. POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array are next generation installments currently in development with vastly increased sensitivities that will achieve unprecedented constraints on cosmological parameters such as the tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of the neutrino masses.

  • Night Skies in the Observatory: "How to find another Earth … Nearby"

    The Franklin Institute

    Professor James Aguirre (UPenn)

    In the last twenty years, the notion that planets exist outside our solar system has moved from informed speculation to hard, observational science.  James will discuss how we find planets outside the solar system, what our prospects are for finding planets truly nearby, and what characteristics those pl

  • Dissertation Defense: "Assembly, Elasticity, and Structure of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals and Disordered Colloids"

    LRSM, Reading Room

    Zoey Davidson (UPenn)

  • Dissertation Defense: "Nano/Biosensors Based on Large Area Graphene"

    Singh Center, Room 035

    Pedro Ducos (UPenn)