Past Events

  • ABO Seminars: "Label-Free Intraoperative Optical Imaging of Breast Tumor Margins and the Microenvironment"

    Donner Building 3400 Spruce Street Donner Auditorium, Basement *Pizza served at 11:45am*

    Stephen Boppart (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)

  • Condensed Matter seminar: "Managing Energy Far From Equilibrium"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Carlos Ortiz, University of Pennsylvania

    Meaningful advances in energy generation, utilization, or storage require exquisite control and optimization of the transport properties of materials far-from-thermal-equilibrium.  Whether concerned with ion-transport through a battery, or molecule extraction through porous rock, or transporting granular matter, a central issue is that of designing materials and flow geometries that give use spatiotemporal control of the mobility of interacting particles.

  • Dissertation Defense: "Studying the Large-Scale Structure and Interstellar Medium of Galaxies During the Epochs of Peak Cosmic Star Formation and Reionization with Infrared Fine Structure Lines"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3W2

    Bade Uzgil (UPenn)

  • Department Colloquium: "Spotting the Elusive Majorana Under the Microscope"

    DRL A8

    Ali Yazdani (Princeton University) Hosted by Eleni Katifori

    Topological superconductors are a distinct form of matter that is predicted to host boundary Majorana fermions. The search for Majorana quasi-particles in condensed matter systems is motivated in part by their potential use as topological qubits to perform fault-tolerant computation aided by their non-Abelian characteristics. Recently, we have proposed a new patform for the realization of Majorana fermions in condensed matter, based on chains of magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor.
  • Dissertation Defense: "Theoretical Studies of Cosmic Acceleration"

    DRL 4E19

    James Stokes (UPenn)

  • High Energy Theory: New Frontiers in Particle Cosmology Pt.2

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N12

    The purpose of this meeting is to bring together experts working at the interface of cosmology, string theory and particle physics for a few days of informal talks and exchanges of ideas. The schedule will allow ample time for impromptu discussions and collaborations.

  • ABO Seminars: "Noncontact Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy and Tomography of Deep Tissue Hemodynamics for Tumor Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring"

    Donner Building 3400 Spruce Street Donner Auditorium, Basement *Pizza served at 11:45am*

    Guoqiang Yu (University of Kentucky)

    Near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy or tomography (DCS/DCT) is a relatively new techniques for measuring/imaging microvascular hemodynamics in a variety of deep/thick tissues. Most DCS/DCT measurements use optical fibers in contact with tissues for photon emission and collection and often require the compression of tissue that can introduce significant distortions in tissue hemodynamics.

  • High Energy Theory: New Frontiers in Particle Cosmology Pt.1

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N12

    The purpose of this meeting is to bring together experts working at the interface of cosmology, string theory and particle physics for a few days of informal talks and exchanges of ideas. The schedule will allow ample time for impromptu discussions and collaborations.

  • Department Colloquium *Special*: "Solving the Solar Neutrino Problem"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Joshua Klein (UPenn) Hosted by Gene Beier

    We will discuss the work of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, and the Penngroup in particular, that provided the solution to the long-standing Solar Neutrino Problem and which has been recognized this year by the Nobel Prize and the Breakthrough Prize. Some discussion of the implications of thesemeasurements and future directions will also be presented.

  • Astro Seminar: "The Scale-Dependence of Halo Assembly Bias"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratoy, A6

    Tomomi Sunayama (Yale University)

    The clustering of dark matter halos is influenced by halo
    properties besides mass, a phenomenon referred to as halo assembly
    bias. It is because halos of the same mass in different environments
    have different assembly histories and cluster differently. There have
    been several studies showing such environmental effects on the linear
    bias of halos. The halo bias on small scales, however, is
    scale-dependent. I will present the first study of the
    scale-dependence of halo assembly bias using the depth of the