Past Events

  • Astronomy seminar: "Stellar Forensics with the Most Powerful Explosions in the Universe"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Maryam Modjaz, New York University

    Supernovae (SNe) and Long-duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are exploding stars and constitute the most powerful explosions in the universe. Since they are visible over large cosmological distances, release elements heavier than Helium, and leave behind extreme remnants such as black holes, they are fascinating objects, as well as crucial tools for many areas of astrophysics, including cosmology.

  • Dissertation Defense: "Testing New Weak Lensing Measurement Techniques with the Dark Energy Survey"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N9

    Christina Krawiec

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: "Pulling the Holographic Boundary into the Bulk"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Yasunori Nomura, University of California Berkeley

  • Special High Energy Theory Seminar: "Primordial black holes as dark matter"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 4N12

    Alex Kusenko, UCLA

    I will discuss new and rather generic scenarios for production of black holes in the early universe.  In some mass range, such black holes can account for all dark matter.  Primordial black holes can also contribute to synthesis of heavy elements by disrupting neutron stars. 

     

  • Experimental Particle Physics Seminar: "Anomaly of Dancing Reactor Antineutrinos"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3C8

    Soo-Bong Kim, Seoul National University

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation(RENO) started data-taking from August, 2011 and has observed the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle theta13. The experiment has analyzed roughly 2200 days of data to make an accurate measurement of the oscillation amplitude and frequency based on energy and baseline dependent disappearance of reactor antineutrinos.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Learning force fields from stochastic trajectories"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Pierre Ronceray, Princeton University

    From nanometer-scale proteins to micron-scale colloidal particles, particles in biological and soft matter systems undergo Brownian dynamics: their deterministic motion due to the forces competes with the random diffusion due to thermal noise. In the absence of forces, all trajectories look alike: the key information characterizing the system's dynamics thus lies in its force field. However, reconstructing the force field by inspecting microscopy observations of the system's trajectory is a hard problem, for two reasons.

  • Astronomy seminar: "Two instruments to start the new decade: HERA for 21cm cosmology and SPARCS to Monitor M-Dwarf flares affecting exoplanets"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Daniel Jacobs, Arizona State University

    Two new kinds of instruments are coming of age at the end of this decade: low frequency radio telescopes and cubesats, both being used to probe questions of our cosmic origin and the nature of exoplanets. The redshifted 21 cm hydrogen line is a unique probe of the early universe. A recent putative detection by EDGES, of a larger than expected signal, raises more questions. The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is designed to answer these questions by providing high significance detection of fluctuations in the redshift range 6 to 20.

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: "Entanglement in gauge theories and gravity"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Jennifer Lin, IAS, Princeton University

    In this talk I'll explain why an analogy between entanglement entropy in an emergent gauge theory and in AdS/CFT suggests that the entropy of a black hole may be related to a natural measure on the gauge group in the bulk. I will then provide an explicit example of this in Jackiw-Teitelboim gravity.

  • High Energy Theory Seminar: "Complementarity from Identity"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 2N36

    Sergei Dubovsky, New York University

  • Department Colloquium: “A New Era of Science at Jefferson Lab”

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Robert McKeown, Deputy Director for Science, JLAB

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility at Jefferson Lab, built with advanced superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, provides opportunities to discover fundamental new aspects of the structure of visible matter – protons, neutrons and other states, and of the strong interaction, described by the gauge theory Quantum Chromodynamics.  The recent upgrade of the facility brings new opportunities, not only in the study of hadronic matter, but also in searches for new physics, such as a suite of experiments to search for massive “dark photons”.  This presentation