Nanotech Gene Sequencing

Prof. Marija Drndic is researching a technique to sequence genes by reading DNA bases as they translocate through a silicon nitride nanopore.  As strands of DNA in a salt solution are driven through the pore by an applied electric field, the electric current passing through changes with the size of the base.  This method could be essential for swift sequencing of genes and personalized medicine.

Functional Imaging in the Brain

A representation of blood flow changes in a rat brain during cortical spreading depression. In the experiment, a large local concentration of KCl initiates a 'wave' of neuronal depolarization that propagates outward from a central point and then repeats itself.  The figure shows images of blood flow in four parallel planes located within 3 millimeters of the skull.

 

Microfluidics

 

Microfluidic channel in place for video microscopy.

Right: Schematic of microchannel, and example velocity profiles superposed on an actual image of the colloidal NIPA suspension.

From the labs of Profs. Doug Durian and Jerry Golub

 

High-Bay Space at DRL

This cube-shaped building sits just east of DRL.  The high-bay provides faculty and students a facility for research, fabrication, and telescope display.  The building has a 42 foot high ceiling, exposed structural steel framing, and a crane beam and glass sliding doors for moving large telescopes in and out.  It was completed in January 2012.

 

Bio-optics and bio-optical materials

Prof. Alison Sweeney and her colleagues believe that the reflective structures in giant clams help them grow algae. The clams use sub-wavelength structures formed from a protein called reflectin to optimize the photosynthesis of the algae living in the clam tissues.

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