Large Synoptic Survey Telescope at Night

A simulated night sky provides a background for the LSST facilities building on Cerro Pachón. The LSST will carry out a deep, 10 year imaging survey in six broad optical bands over the main survey area of 18,000 square degrees. Penn physicists play important roles in the leadership and anticipated dark energy science that will come from LSST.

 

MRSEC Research at Penn

The P&A department plays a large role in the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM). One focus of LRSM research between faculty from different departments and schools is soft matter and how it conforms, assembles, and reconfigures in response to the geometry and chemistry of bounding surfaces and interfaces.

 

CNT Transistor with Antibodies

Prof. Charlie Johnson's lab has produced new experiments demonstrating that carbon nanotube transistors (CNT) can detect minute quantities of biomarkers of diseases in less time than conventional methods.  Antibodies attached to 
CNT on a silicon chip change the electrical properties of the chip upon antibody-antigen binding hence detecting disease biomarkers.

Dipole magnets at the Large Hadron Collider

Protons at the LHC are accelerated to 7 TeV (the equivalent energy to an electron subjected to the potential of more than 4.5 trillion batteries laid end-to-end).  To circulate such powerful beams of particles, the LHC employs superconducting dipole magnets like those shown to provide a magnetic field almost 100,000 times stronger than the earth's magnetic field.

 

DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid

Single-stranded DNA and carbon nanotubes are chemically compatible and readily self-assemble into DNA-carbon nanotube hybrids (pictured here).  These materials have applications in nanoelectronics, medicine, environmental safety and homeland security.  Dr. Robert R. Johnson of the University of Pennsylvania has used computer simulation to study the structure of these nanomaterials.