Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes

The image shows an example of peptides that assemble into a tubular structure surrouding single-walled carbon nanotubes.  The geometrically defined, virus-like coating created by these peptides converts the smooth surfaces of carbon nanotubes into highly textured assemblies with long-scale order, capable of directing the assembly of gold nanoparticles into helical arrays along the nanotube axis.

 

Reflective Self-Assembling Proteins

Prof. Alison Sweeney studies the biophysical properties of reflectin - a highly reflective and self-organizing squid protein found in cephalopods like the Hawaiian Bobtail squid shown here.

 

DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid

Single-stranded DNA and carbon nanotubes are chemically compatible and readily self-assemble into DNA-carbon nanotube hybrids (pictured here).  These materials have applications in nanoelectronics, medicine, environmental safety and homeland security.  Dr. Robert R. Johnson of the University of Pennsylvania has used computer simulation to study the structure of these nanomaterials.

 

Graphene

Penn physicists study graphenes, atomically thin sheets of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice. Graphene is the prototype Dirac material hosting a solid state realization of an ultra-relativistic electron gas and accessing new phenomena that are controlled by electric and magnetic fields and by the atomic registry when graphenes are stacked.

Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The newly-opened (Oct. 4, 2013) 78,000 square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology serves as Penn's focal point for nanoscience research and technology-development.  P&A's Prof. Jay Kikkawa was instrumental in the planning and provision of vital services for the new facility.

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