DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid

Single-stranded DNA and carbon nanotubes are chemically compatible and readily self-assemble into DNA-carbon nanotube hybrids (pictured here).  These materials have applications in nanoelectronics, medicine, environmental safety and homeland security.  Dr. Robert R. Johnson of the University of Pennsylvania has used computer simulation to study the structure of these nanomaterials.

 

Supernovae from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

Part of the images of all the supernovae from the 2005-2007 observing campaigns of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

 

Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The newly-opened (Oct. 4, 2013) 78,000 square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology serves as Penn's focal point for nanoscience research and technology-development.  P&A's Prof. Jay Kikkawa was instrumental in the planning and provision of vital services for the new facility.

LaBr3 detector modules for Next Generation PET scanners

On the left is a schematic of adjacent modules with overlapping photomultiplier tubes while the right is a photograph of a single module with PMT's and 8-mm thick light guide.  Improvements in timing resolution for time-of-flight PET is the research of Adjunct Prof. Joel Karp in Penn Radiology.

Nanoscale Electronic Nose

Prof. Charlie Johnson's group at Penn have coupled olfactory receptor proteins from mice to carbon nanotubes to create a prototype electronic nose. Olfactory receptors are embedded in nanodiscs that mimic the environment of the olfactory cell membrane.  Odorant molecules bind to the receptor, which produces an electrical response in the carbon nanotube (gray cylinder).

 

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