CNT Transistor with Antibodies

Prof. Charlie Johnson's lab has produced new experiments demonstrating that carbon nanotube transistors (CNT) can detect minute quantities of biomarkers of diseases in less time than conventional methods.  Antibodies attached to 
CNT on a silicon chip change the electrical properties of the chip upon antibody-antigen binding hence detecting disease biomarkers.

Supernovae from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

Part of the images of all the supernovae from the 2005-2007 observing campaigns of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

 

Reflective Self-Assembling Proteins

Prof. Alison Sweeney studies the biophysical properties of reflectin - a highly reflective and self-organizing squid protein found in cephalopods like the Hawaiian Bobtail squid shown here.

 

Protein-Nanotube Hybrid

The image depicts a nanobiosensor consisting of a carbon nanotube (gray) covalently attached to the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (magenta). This device detects the adenovirus, one of the viruses responsible for the common cold, when Knob proteins from the virus capsid (orange) bind to the receptor (magenta). These devices were synthesized in Prof. Charlie Johnson's group.

 

Dipole magnets at the Large Hadron Collider

Protons at the LHC are accelerated to 7 TeV (the equivalent energy to an electron subjected to the potential of more than 4.5 trillion batteries laid end-to-end).  To circulate such powerful beams of particles, the LHC employs superconducting dipole magnets like those shown to provide a magnetic field almost 100,000 times stronger than the earth's magnetic field.

 

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