Events

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Bending Rules in Graphene Kirigami"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Gene Mele (University of Pennsylvania)

    The three dimensional shapes of graphene sheets produced by nanoscale cut-and--join kirigami are studied by combining large-scale atomistic modelling with continuum elastic theory. Lattice segments are selectively removed from a flat graphene sheet and the structure is allowed to close and reconstruct by relaxing in the third dimension. The surface relaxation is limited by a nonzero bending modulus which produces a smoothly modulated landscape instead of the ridge-and-plateau motif found in macroscopic lattice kirigami.

  • Welcome Incoming Students

    The Deck

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "The Granular Physics of (Real) Landscapes"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Doug Jerolmack (University of Pennsylvania)

    The Earth's surface is a granular-fluid interface, shaped by the feedbacks among water/air flow, topography and particle transport. A bewildering array of patterns arise due to the unstable nature of a sheared, granular free-surface; witness dunes, river networks and barrier islands, for example. For almost a century, research on understanding landscape patterns and predicting rates of sediment transport has focused on developing an ever-more detailed description of the turbulent fluid; the coupling to particle motion is often an afterthought.

  • Dissertation Defense: "On Abelian and Discrete Symmetries in F-Theory"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 3C6

    Hernan Piragua

  • Department Colloquium: TBA

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Jun Zhang, NYU-Courant Institute

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Imposing Curved Shapes on Solid Sheets: Instabilities, Isometries and Asymptotic Isometries"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Benny Davidovitch (UMass, Amherst)

    Imposing a curved shape on a solid sheet, generates in it elastic stress. This familiar motif is a consequence of Gauss’ theorema

    Egregium, which posits that there exists no isometric map between two surfaces of different Gaussian curvatures. This coupling between geometry (curvature) and mechanics (stress) underlies the morphological richness observed in solid sheets, and their nontrivial response to exerted forces.

  • Department Colloquium: TBA

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A8

    Benoit Famaey (Strasbourg Observatory)

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "TBA"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Marcus Roper (UCLA)

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Physical Aspects of Spindle Assembly"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A4

    Dan Needleman (Harvard)

    The spindle is a complex assembly of microtubules, motors, and other associated proteins, which segregates chromosomes during cell division. In metaphase, the spindle exists in a steady-state with a constant flux of molecules and energy continuously modifying and maintaining its architecture.  While many of the individual components of the spindle have been studied in detail, it is still unclear how these molecular constituents self-organize into this structure.

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Physical Aspects of Spindle Assembly"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, TBD

    Kaare Jensen (TU of Denmark)