Self-assembling Building Blocks

Self-assembling building blocks occur in a diverse set of supramolecular, macromolecular, and other complex systems that impact numerous fields such as industrial dyes and pigments, xerographic receptors, organic semiconductors, transistors, light-emitting diodes and solar cells.  Prof. Paul Heiney collaborates with chemists and material scientists on the study of such molecular systems.

 

Microfluidics

 

Microfluidic channel in place for video microscopy.

Right: Schematic of microchannel, and example velocity profiles superposed on an actual image of the colloidal NIPA suspension.

From the labs of Profs. Doug Durian and Jerry Golub

 

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope at Night

A simulated night sky provides a background for the LSST facilities building on Cerro Pachón. The LSST will carry out a deep, 10 year imaging survey in six broad optical bands over the main survey area of 18,000 square degrees. Penn physicists play important roles in the leadership and anticipated dark energy science that will come from LSST.

 

High-Bay Space at DRL

This cube-shaped building sits just east of DRL.  The high-bay provides faculty and students a facility for research, fabrication, and telescope display.  The building has a 42 foot high ceiling, exposed structural steel framing, and a crane beam and glass sliding doors for moving large telescopes in and out.  It was completed in January 2012.

 

Graphene

Penn physicists study graphenes, atomically thin sheets of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice. Graphene is the prototype Dirac material hosting a solid state realization of an ultra-relativistic electron gas and accessing new phenomena that are controlled by electric and magnetic fields and by the atomic registry when graphenes are stacked.

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