Carbon Nanotube FET Sensor

Schematic of a carbon nanotube FET sensor functionalized with an antibody to a Lyme disease biomarker protein.  The insulating substrate is shown in pink.  When antigen molecules bind to the antibody, the electrical characteristics of the FET are altered.

From the lab of Prof. Charlie Johnson.

Master of Medical Physics

The Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences, in conjunction with the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology in the School of Medicine, offers the Master of Medical Physics degree. The program is intended for technically prepared college graduates who seek to combine their interests in graduate physics with growing career opportunities in the field of medicine.

 

Dipole magnets at the Large Hadron Collider

Protons at the LHC are accelerated to 7 TeV (the equivalent energy to an electron subjected to the potential of more than 4.5 trillion batteries laid end-to-end).  To circulate such powerful beams of particles, the LHC employs superconducting dipole magnets like those shown to provide a magnetic field almost 100,000 times stronger than the earth's magnetic field.

 

Microfluidics

 

Microfluidic channel in place for video microscopy.

Right: Schematic of microchannel, and example velocity profiles superposed on an actual image of the colloidal NIPA suspension.

From the labs of Profs. Doug Durian and Jerry Golub

 

Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The newly-opened (Oct. 4, 2013) 78,000 square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology serves as Penn's focal point for nanoscience research and technology-development.  P&A's Prof. Jay Kikkawa was instrumental in the planning and provision of vital services for the new facility.

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