Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The newly-opened (Oct. 4, 2013) 78,000 square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology serves as Penn's focal point for nanoscience research and technology-development.  P&A's Prof. Jay Kikkawa was instrumental in the planning and provision of vital services for the new facility.

Microfluidics

 

Microfluidic channel in place for video microscopy.

Right: Schematic of microchannel, and example velocity profiles superposed on an actual image of the colloidal NIPA suspension.

From the labs of Profs. Doug Durian and Jerry Golub

 

Topological Insulators

This image shows the valence and conduction bands in the phase transition from topological insulator to conventional insulator with increasing tensile strain.

 

Nanoscale Electronic Nose

Prof. Charlie Johnson's group at Penn have coupled olfactory receptor proteins from mice to carbon nanotubes to create a prototype electronic nose. Olfactory receptors are embedded in nanodiscs that mimic the environment of the olfactory cell membrane.  Odorant molecules bind to the receptor, which produces an electrical response in the carbon nanotube (gray cylinder).

 

Neuroscience

Prof. Vijay Balasubramanian's research includes studies of structural and functional organization of the retina with multi-electrode arrays that record retinal ganglion cells. He also studies computational principles that underlie the organization of circuits in the early visual system.

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