Events

  • Special Seminar: "Searches for Supersymmetry with ATLAS"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, room 2C4

    Lawrence Lee, Harvard University

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Physics and Applications of Mesoscopic Optics"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Hui Cao, Yale University

    Random scattering of light, e.g., in paint, clouds, and biological tissue, is a common process of both fundamental interest and practical relevance. The interference of multiply scattered waves also leads to remarkable phenomena in mesoscopic physics such as Anderson localization and universal conductance fluctuations. In applications, optical scattering is the main obstacle to imaging or sending information through turbid media.

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  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "TBA"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Peter Yunker, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Geometrically frustrated self-assembly: what determines the dimensionality of the aggregates?"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Pierre Ronceray, Princeton University

    Irregularly shaped particles with attractive interactions, such as proteins or patchy colloids, are in general frustrated: it is impossible to arrange them in space such that all attractive interactions are simultaneously satisfied. In a dense phase, this implies that any configuration must include defects to the favoured local order.

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  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "TBA"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Eva-Marie Shoetz Collins, Swarthmore College

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Topological Origin of Equatorial Waves"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Brad Marston, Brown University

    Topology sheds new light on the emergence of unidirectional edge waves in a variety of physical systems, from condensed matter to artificial lattices. Waves observed in geophysical flows are also robust to perturbations, which suggests a role for topology. We show a topological origin for two celebrated equatorially trapped waves known as Kelvin and Yanai modes, due to the Earth’s rotation that breaks time-reversal symmetry. The non-trivial structure of the bulk Poincare ́ wave modes encoded through the first Chern number of value 2 guarantees existence for these waves.

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  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "TBA"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Keith Nelson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Condensed Matter Seminar: "Revisiting and Repurposing the Double Helix"

    David Rittenhouse Laboratory, A6

    Taekjip Ha, Johns Hopkins University

    DNA is an iconic molecule that forms a double helical structure, providing the basis for genetic inheritance, and its physical properties have been studied for decades. In this talk, I will present evidence that sequence and methylation dependent physical properties of DNA such as flexibility and self-association may be important for biological functions [1, 2]. In addition, I will present a new application of DNA where mechanical modulations of cell behavior can be studied at the single molecule level using rupturable DNA tethers [3].

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